Review: Sailor 1911M

Sailor 1911M posted shown on mirrorNext up for review is my Sailor 1911M in yellow with a broad nib. I had already decided the pen isn’t a keeper and sold it off. Unfortunately it came back to me with flow issues. After I confirmed the problem, but couldn’t see a cause, I pulled the nib and feed (simple friction fit) and scrubbed them clean (or more accurately, ultrasoniced them clean). I inked it up to give it a test, so I might as well review it.

The main reason I decided to sell this pen is the broad nib. Broad nibs aren’t for me so I’ve been either grinding them to something else or selling them off.

Why I Got It

I purchased the Sailor 1911M in October of 2005 from Fountain Pen Hospital. I already had a couple of full size 1911s and loved the 21kt nibs on them. The 1911M nib isn’t 21kt, it’s 14kt gold but I figured I’d give the broad nib a try. At the time I was still exploring nibs.

What I Got

The Sailor 1911M is a cartridge/converter pen using Sailor’s proprietary cartridges and converters. It’s a bright yellow pen with gold trim and black accents. I really like the look of the pen. At the time it was probably my most colorful pen. The gold cap band is engraved “SAILOR JAPAN FOUNDED 1911”.

The pen has a 14kt gold broad nib. Even though the nib is engraved “H-B” for hard broad, there’s a little spring to the nib which is a solid gold color. It’s certainly not flex. It’s less springy than my Pilot Custom 823 nib but springier than my Lamy 2000 nib. The Sailor logo and “14K” are engraved on the nib.

I don’t remember the packaging, but a converter and cartridge were certainly included.

The Numbers

  • Length Capped: 5.3030″ (134.70 mm)
  • Length Uncapped: 4.5915″ (116.62 mm)
  • Length Posted: 5.8205″ (147.84 mm)
  • Section Length: 0.6095″ (15.48 mm)
  • Section Diameter (near nib): 0.3760″ (9.55 mm)
  • Section Diameter (below threads): 0.4130″ (10.49 mm)
  • Section Diameter (mid-section): 0.3935″ (9.99 mm)
  • Cap Diameter (at cap band): 0.5820″ (14.78 mm)
  • Barrel Diameter: 0.4820″ (12.24 mm)
  • Weight (w/converter and ink): 20 grams
  • Weight (w/converter and ink): 12 grams

Writing With The Pen

Sailor 1911M broad nibSailor uses a proprietary cartridge which has a larger capacity than the standard short international cartridge but seem to be about the same as the long international cartridges. The converters seem to have about the same capacity as most standard converters although I haven’t done any measurements. The opening to the feed is larger than a standard international which seems to help the flow. I’ve never had a flow problem with a Sailor pen and this is one probably one reason why that is. The broad nib also keeps plenty of ink moving during fast writing. Well, no problem until I sold the pen and it came back to me with flow problems.

Uncapping the pen takes about 1 3/4 full turns to remove the cap and get the pen ready for writing. The cap does post securely, although held in place only with friction. The cap band should help prevent cracking from repeated posting. I don’t post my pens but the pen feels well balanced when posted. This isn’t surprising since the plastic cap is very light.

The Sailor 1911M is a light pen that didn’t cause fatigue in a long writing session. It’s also has a comfortable shape and size that fits my hand well.

The broad nib is nice and smooth with a good ink flow. I consider it a wet writer although I tend to like nibs on the drier side so others may argue with the “wet” description. It’s not a gusher. Broad nibs aren’t for me so this isn’t a pen I would reach for if I wasn’t writing this review. But there’s nothing technically wrong with the nib. Even though it’s wider than I like, my Pelikan broad nibs were wider (as are many other western broad nibs), although drier. This is one of my more pleasing standard broad nibs since it’s relatively thin when compared to other broad nibs that I’ve used.

The writing sample shows that I can easily write along the narrow lines with the broad nib and still read each letter. In comparison, the Schmidt broad nib in the KarasKustoms ink turns the circular letters into blobs.

Ink likes to spread out on the nib. Not so much “nib creep” which I consider ink spreading from the slit between the tines, but ink splattered on the nib. There’s also a lot of ink splatter in the cap. It’s not dripping out o the cap, but when I posted the cap it left a drop of ink on the barrel which I had to rub off. Likewise ink has stained the threads a bit. This has been a problem with the pen since I got it and doesn’t seem related to any one ink. I embrace the creep and like a nib that looks well used so this doesn’t bother me too much.

Inks Used

Sailor 1911M with Waterman Purple bottleI used Waterman Purple when I inked the pen up for this review. Flow was good and there wasn’t any skipping. Maybe it was that the nib puts down more ink than I’m used to, but I wrote this pen dry faster than I expected which makes me wonder if ink evaporated as the pen sat around. If I had to estimate, I figure I write the equivalent of 10 full size pages with the pen. I could pause for several minutes and the nib would remain wet, so it wasn’t quick to evaporate off the nib.

I don’t remember what other inks I used in the pen. Certainly Waterman inks based on when I got the pen. I’ve never had any performance problems with any ink. Although as I already mentioned ink splatter was common among all inks.

Cleaning the Pen

The pen is easy to clean. Although the flow issue my have been due to some careless cleaning before storing the pen. It takes a couple flushes of the bulb syringe to remove traces of the ink from the feed. The nib and feed are friction fit so they can easily be removed for a thorough cleaning.

The converter also comes apart easily for cleaning. The converter does seem well made and it should hold up well after dis-assembly. I did have to disassemble it to get the Waterman Purple from around the piston. This is only abut the second time I had to dis-assemble the converter.

Almost all the stains on the threads and the ink from inside the cap did wash away although some of the stains didn’t go away until they spent some time in the ultrasonic cleaner.

Wrapping Up

The Sailor is a well built pen with the classic cigar shape. The Sailor nib is also free of complaints. Yet, the Sailor 1911M comes across as an average pen. Nothing stands out to recommend it as a “must have.” The nib is too wet for my tastes. The pen currently retails for about $156 which does seem like a fair price for the pen since it’s solidly built and has a gold nib that was smooth and aligned.

I have been regrinding some of my broad nibs since they aren’t suited to my writing style. But I won’t be doing that with the Sailor 1911M. Nothing about it stands out when compared to other fountain pens in my accumulation. After using this pen again it made me reconsider my decision to sell the pen. It’s a nice writer and there are times where I want a broad nib and this one isn’t so wide as to be unusable for me. I will probably offer the pen for sale again because it’s really not one I would pick up over others in my accumulation. So I’d have to say it’s not a keeper.

Gallery

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One thought on “Review: Sailor 1911M

  1. Pingback: Just another pen ?!Blick über den Tellerrand vom 14. February 2015 - Just another pen ?!

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