This Just In: Sailor Pro Gear King of Pen

Sailor Pro Gear King of Pen - capped on standThe Sailor Pro Gear King of Pen in black with rhodium trim and a medium nib was my first fountain pen purchase of the 2016 DC Pen Show. It happened before lunch on Friday when I bought it from Anderson Pens before their table became packed with people.

The King of Pen has been on my watch list for almost a year. It moved close to the top a couple of months ago and I began researching it more aggressively. I like the size of the pen and love Sailor nibs. I have a couple of it’s smaller siblings and love them.

The KOP nib is springier than the Sailor nibs that I’m used to. I was concerned it would be mushy, like the Pelikan M1000 nib I tried in the past. While all the indications were that this would not be the case, I still had some doubts. My second concern was that this nib was only available in medium and broad (the bespoke nibs aren’t for me) which are not my preferred nib sizes. It is a Japanese medium so it wouldn’t be too wide. I could get the nib ground down but I don’t like doing that until I’ve experienced the stock nib for a little while, if only to see what it’s like. So I knew I wouldn’t have it worked on at the show.

A nice thing about the pen shows, besides the ability to see and touch the pen, is the ability to talk to people who have used the pen, or have one to try. So I left the Anderson Pens table fairly sure I would be getting the KOP but did some more exploration and consideration before I returned and bought the pen.

The King of Pen is an expensive pen, but this particular model is the “entry level” and therefore least expensive version. It also helps that I really like black & rhodium fountain pens.

I picked KWZ Gummiberry (non-IG) as the pens first ink. I was anxious to ink the pen so I was limited to the four inks I had purchased at the show. While I don’t like using a new (to me) ink in a new (to me) fountain pen, I wasn’t willing to wait. This ink seemed like a safe choice in a converter fill pen, plus I thought a wider nib would show off this ink better than my typical thin nib. I was thrilled with the combination. The KOP is a terrific writer, smooth and skip-free. In short, all my concerns about the nib vanished. I love it. I have a light touch so there’s really no spreading of the tines (not that the nib is flexible) and it’s a thin Japanese medium line.

I don’t have any experience with this ink so I can’t say how it affects my impression of the pen. It’s no surprise that this nib is wetter than my typical nib choice, but it’s not too wet for me. I expect to use this pen differently than an extra fine nib. My writing is a little bigger when I use it. If my writing speeds up the letters do close up so I need to slow down a bit. None of this is a huge difference and it’s a pleasant experience when I just want to write. Naturally the draft of this article was written with the pen.

As expected, the pen feels and looks solidly built. There’s a nice tall collar around the converter to help hold it straight and in place. There’s a cutout in the collar so the ink level can be viewed. The lettering around the capband and the anchor imprint in the cap finial are nice and crisp.

Black and silver is a pretty basic look, especially when compared to other KOP models but I like it a lot. It may be the new pen glow talking, but the Sailor Pro Gear King of Pen is a rival to my Visconti Homo Sapien Bronze Age as my favorite fountain pen.

Sailor Pro Gear King of Pen - uncapped on stand

Sailor Pro Gear KOP medium nib writing sample with KWZ Gummiberry ink

This is a post about the 2016 Washington DC Pen Show. My show summary and links to other show posts are here.

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3 thoughts on “This Just In: Sailor Pro Gear King of Pen

  1. I can see why this is a favourite pen, dark, simple and classy. I, although female, have long, widely spaced fingers from bassoon playing, thus I love the heft and size of these pens.

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