Saying Goodbye: Waterman Edson

Waterman Edson on standI sold off three of my Waterman fountain pens last week, including my Waterman Edson which I reviewed here. The Edson was my first “executive” pen, and one of my first expensive fountain pens, along with the Caran d’Ache Ivanhoe that I got about the same time. It’s very gold and very blue. I did use the pen a lot when I first got it, and I considered it worth the price. By the time I started keeping track of my pen & ink usage, 10 years later, my usage was nearly non-existent. I used it once in 2014 and once again in 2018.

The Edson wrote as well as it did when new, but my aesthetics tastes had turned against both gold and blue. Plus, I now had many more options to choose from. The pen is a nice size, and I can use it for long writing sessions without any fatigue. Usability was not a factor in my decision to sell.

The non-aesthetic negatives were relatively minor. The Edson was tedious to clean. It took forever to flush all traces of ink out of the feed. I also had to take extra care when filling the pen with bottled ink. The ink would stain my fingers from the breather hole unless I dripped out a couple drops after the fill, and wiped the breather hole clean of ink. Early on I used cartridges, and this wasn’t a problem.

I kept passing over the pen because I no longer loved the look, so that was the main reason I decided to sell. There’s too much gold. I never really like blue, although the sapphire barrel on this pen has a nice depth to it. Back in 2003, I’m not sure I even knew other colors were available, although only the sapphire and a more expensive limited edition model was being made in 2003.

While I don’t keep track, I think the Waterman Edson is the first pen I bought new, used it, and then sold it for more than I paid (ignoring inflation).

The Waterman Edson is a fountain pen that I enjoyed and used when I got it, but then my tastes changed, and I moved on.

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