Saying Goodbye: Sometimes It’s Not That Hard

Franklin-Christoph Model 20 medium nib Tiger Red body

On Wednesdays in March I’ve been posting Goodbye articles about pens that I sold off the week before. Usually, it’s been a pen that I felt I should like, or did like at one time, but its history of non-use made it evident that it wouldn’t find a place in my regular rotation. I had to force the logical side of my brain to take control and let the pen go..

No such problem with the four pens sold last week. The three Franklin-Christophs were long-unused, but unlike some other Franklin-Christophe I didn’t feel the slightest urge to ink them up. The same with the Kaweco Sport, although that was more because it was one of three Sports, and I liked the other two more.

The three F-C pens had a combined 16 1/2 years in my accumulation, yet had only been used a total of 8 times. It’s no surprise that most of those uses were when the pens were new(ish).

I had two Model 20 pens and decided to keep one. But that was mainly because it has a history of some leaking, I didn’t want to troubleshoot the leaks, or use the pen enough to confirm it no longer leaked, so it stayed, and the other one went. I certainly don’t need both pens.

The Model 19 (my review)was another failed attempt at exploring nibs outside my comfort zone. The nib was too wide to get any regular use by me. While a new nib or a nib grind was certainly an option, the pen didn’t excite me.

The Model 29 had the distinction of kicking off what became a F-C addiction. Unfortunately, the newer Franklin-Christoph pens pushed it far out of the rotation.

While it was easy to say goodbye to these three Franklin-Christoph pens, I have a bunch of Model 02 and Model 03 pens (they are similar). I inked one up to test it, before selling, and decided I didn’t want to sell it. Eventually I sell one or two of them, but for now, I can’t decide which pens or nibs to keep. For now, I’ll put off the decision until I’ve further reduced my fountain pens and figure out which on fits into the reduced accumulation.

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