This Just In: Lamy Aion Dark Green

Lamy Aion fountain pen

It’s been a long time since I’ve done a This Just In post, and even those last few stretched the meaning of This Just In. It’s time to return to my original intent with these posts, my first impressions within days of a new pens arrival.

The Lamy Aion Dark Green arrived on Monday, I inked it up Tuesday morning, and this post is being written on Thursday evening. Which means, don’t take this as anything resembling a thorough review, or even that my impressions won’t change.

So on to the pen…

The Lamy Aion wasn’t on my radar until I saw the Dark Green, and I immediately wanted it. From the picture it seemed like it could be another thin Lamy pen since there wasn’t anything else in the photo for scale. But the beautiful green color made me do some research.

The Aion reviews that I found were mixed, but seemed weighted on the negative side of the scale. In reading the reviews I found that many of the complaints were actually things I like in a fountain pen. The most common complaint was that the pen was chunky. Merriam-Webster defines chunky as “heavy, solid, and thick or bulky.” I don’t consider those as negative traits, unless taken to an extreme.

The Dark Green is a 2021 special edition, although it’s priced exactly the same as a basic black (or silver) Lamy Aion. Previous special editions are Blue (2019) & Red (2020), both of which can still be found new if you search hard enough. This is a good indicator that I didn’t need to rush the purchase. But I wanted the green, so while I didn’t need to rush, I wasn’t going to dawdle.

The Aion was designed by Jasper Morrison, a British designer of many non-pen products. I was a little concerned that he might do something weird with the design in order to make his mark. While there are design complaints, such as chunky it’s a minimalist, but otherwise valid design.

It was rolling out in the US and several places has it in stock so I could have ordered one, but I did hold off ordering for a bit. Of the retailers I watch, Anderson Pens was the last to list it for sale, which was about the time I decided to buy one. As I mentioned before, it arrived on Monday.

The Lamy Aion arrived in basic packaging and included an ink cartridge, a converter, a marketing/instruction pamphlet and warranty pamphlet. I ordered mine with an extra-fine nib.

Lamy Aion Dark green with packaging

First Inking

Lamy Aion Dark nib comparison
(L->R) Fine-> Lamy Aion extra-fine -> Lamy extra-fine (click for full-size image)

As is my current practice, I popped the included ink cartridge onto the Aion. By the time I grabbed a piece of paper the ink had reached the nib, and was ready to write.

Speaking of the nib; it isn’t the same that’s used in the Safaris, AL-Stars , and other Lamy pens. It will fit the feed of those fountain pens (except the Lamy 2000) so the nibs are interchangeable. The Aion nib starts tapering in to the point further from the barrel.

Writing with the Lamy Aion

Lamy Aion Dark Green, fine nib,uncapped with writing sample

I was shocked with how smooth the extra-fine nib is. It’s terrific. Despite having an aluminum gripping section the pen doesn’t slip in my hand. The section feels like it has an ever so slight texture to it, although it isn’t visible.

For some reason, it takes me a moment or two to settle the pen into my grip as I get ready to write with the nib in the right position. I’ll probably get used to it over time. I use a Penwell Traveller at my desk. I soft cap the pen in the Penwell when I take a break. Since the pen is in the same orientation when I place and remove it, this isn’t a problem when I’m at my desk. It still takes me a moment if the pen has been capped and on my desk in a pen case. It’s a problem I have with hooded or small nibs. But the Aion’s nib is neither hooded or small, so I’m not sure why I have to concentrate when first holding the pen.

The inner cap only reaches about half-way down from the top of the cap. If insert the pen at a slight angle, something I do a lot, the edge of the pen catches on the inner cap. It doesn’t appear capable of bending the nib itself, but it is annoying to have to straighten the barrel on half my capping attempts.

I like pens on the chunky and heavy part of the spectrum, so it’s not that all those reviews are wrong, but I love writing with the Lamy Aion. And I love seeing the color on my desk when I’m not using the pen. I don’t post my pens, and the unposted pen is plenty long enough to be comfortable.

The nib is a smooth, consistent writer. I haven’t experienced any hard starts or skipping.

Wrapping Up

I’m impressed with the Lamy Aion Dark Green and I love it so far. Granted, it’s only been three days. I ordered a 14k gold oblique-medium nib with the attempt to use it on this pen if it was comfortable. Well, it’s comfortable, but the Aion’s steel nib is so good that I’ll probably be forced to find another pen for the oblique-medium.

This pen is definitely a keeper, it needs a little more time in my hand to earn its place as a core pen.

2 thoughts on “This Just In: Lamy Aion Dark Green”

  1. Mm…
    Chonky/chunky, all metal AND close to British Racing Green! Nirvana (no – not the band). Shame I just pulled the trigger on a stainless steel 2000… now it’ll have to wait until the wife’s distracted again.

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  2. Great review! That is a stunning shade of green. Lamy pens are not really my taste, but I do appreciate that their designs are well pedigreed and fit in a coherent style. I liked your point about people knocking a pen for things you actually like. For me, it’s black and gold pens. I love black pens with gold trim, but they seem to leave most pen aficionados cold. That’s why we have a wonderful variety of pens – something for everyone.

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