Ink and Pen Notes: Franklin-Christoph Model 20 with Akkerman #28

Franklin-Christoph Model 20 stub nib with Akkerman #28 ink bottleThe Franklin-Christoph Model 20 Marietta with it’s medium stub nib is a pen that has leaked with it’s last couple of fills. This time I remembered the experience and was more cautious. I made sure the nib was firmly installed and that the converter was firmly inserted. I also kept the pen house bound so that it didn’t bounce around in a computer bag or even my pocket.

I inked the fountain pen up with P.W. Akkerman #28 Hofkwartier Groen back on March 13th. By the 17th enough ink had accumulated in the cap to be noticeable and some had transferred to the section on its way to my fingers. As before, there’s no obvious leak and it seems to be coming through the feed.

Leaking pen aside, I enjoyed this combination. This is the first Akkerman ink that I’ve liked enough to know I will gladly use it again. It performed well in this stub nib.

I’ll refill the Franklin-Christoph Model 20 with Athena Sepia which was it’s first ink and the only one that didn’t leak. I do expect it to now leak, but we’ll see.

There’s no nib close-ups in the photos since I flushed the pen before taking the photos. For nib close-ups see this previous post.

Franklin-Christoph Model 20 stub nib with Akkerman #28 ink writing sample

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Long Island Pen Show

Saturday brought a quick visit to the Long Island Pen Show. It was more crowded and congested than I remember from other years. The layout was the same as I remember so they didn’t seem to be squeezing in extra tables, meaning the congestion was from attendees which is a good things. I’m terrible at estimating and the table setup didn’t make it easy to count (no count one row and multiply) so I won’t try to estimate either the number of vendors or people. There seemed to be more nib workers there than in past shows, even though Richard Binder skipped this show.

There were more vendors selling new pens than in past years (based on my possibly faulty memory) but there were certainly more vintage dealers than new pen dealers. Although between Anderson Pens, Fountain Pen Hospital and Kenro Industries there was certainly a wide variety of new pen brands even before considering the smaller dealers.

I did see a Visconti Homo Sapien Dark Age. While a very nice pen I like my Bronze Age better and the tenuous hold the Dark Age had in my want list was lost. There was a time I would have preferred the all black design but these days I like either a very conservative all black without shading and little or no trim, or a pen with some contrast to it. Other window shopping was mainly vintage pens. A lot of interesting stuff, even if most were unfamiliar to me.

I did pick up some inks. They were a pre-order so this may not count as a pen show purchase, but here they are:

Three Long Island Pen Show Inks and their first pens,

The three pen show inks and the first pens I selected for them.

With Omas winding down I picked up Omas Green. This has been on my want list for awhile since I like green. I have Omas Black and Turquoise inks and while I’m not a fan of turquoise as a color I like the Omas Black and the turquoise performs well. My first impression of the Omas Green – very nice color, I like it. I haven’t used it enough to judge performance but if it’s anything like the other Omas inks I may have to buy a second bottle before it vanishes.

I also picked up another green ink, this one P.W. Akkerman #28 Hofkwartier Groen. This is my third Akkerman ink. These inks were all the rage a couple years ago but I skipped them at that time. I’ve since picked up a couple, after they changed to the smaller bottles. The inks are fine but they aren’t close to being favorites for either of the colors that I’ve tried. I haven’t used this one enough to form an opinion. I can’t complain about the color since I knew what I was getting. It’s different than my other greens (more a yellow-green) which is why I got it, but there’s a reason it’s taken me awhile to add this shade of green. So it will probably be used less-frequently than other greens. They have the nicest ink bottle out there and the only built-in filling system that work flawlessly with all my pens.

Lastly, Noodler’s Berning Red. It’s a fast drying ink intended for lefties, which I’m not. I often use red to mark up documents so quick drying will help me avoid the occasional smudge. My concern here was bleed-through, since the fast drying is due to fast absorption. My initial test on Staples (cheap) copy paper is that it is fine (although close in spots of heavy ink), even with a medium nib. I don’t follow Noodler’s ink all that much, but this seems to be one of Nathan Tardiff’s more blatant (some may say extreme) political inks. The target is a current candidate so probably not surprising. If you watch the video it will take about 20 minutes to get to the ink (and even then there’s discussion about the pen he’s using, just no more politics).

Fountain Pen Hospital was one of the show sponsors so they were offering a $10 gift card at the door. They also offered their parts bags. The gift card required a $50 purchase and the parts pens were $50 per bag. So naturally I had to pick one up. I selected a bag of Parkers. All are missing nibs (well, one has a mangled nib) but this seems to be a good selection for learning how they are but together. I can tackle learning vacumatic repair with these and not worry about ruining a usable or even repairable pen.

Parker parts from the Long Island Pen Show

Overall, a good show that was worth the trip, even if most of it was window shopping.

Ink & Pen Notes: Pilot Vanishing Point Cherry Bamboo with P.W. Akkerman Oranje Boven

Pilot Vanishing Point Red Bamboo with Akkermann Oranje BovenBoth the Cherry Bamboo Vanishing Point and the Left Oblique nib are relatively new, arriving in June. P.W. Akkerman Oranje Boven is only the second ink for this pen and nib. I like the color orange, but it seems like orange fountain pen inks never live up to my expectations. I’ve also never tried an Akkerman ink so picking Oranje Boven as my first Akkerman ink was a leap of faith.

I picked the left oblique nib for this ink because I figured the bright color would benefit from the wide, at least for me, nib and the line variation would go well with any shading. Well, there wasn’t any shading to speak of. Other than that I found it to be a nice ink. There was just a bit of feathering on some paper and the line wasn’t always true to the nib size. The nice bright color made up for these minor deficiencies.

Still, this ink & pen combo never really grabbed my attention. I inked it up back on August 10th. I took about six weeks for me to write the pen dry (I’m a little slow getting these notes posted). Considering that the capacity of the con–20 converter is relatively small this tells that I wasn’t enamored by this nib and ink.

I currently have over a dozen pens inked so the Vanishing Point and the left oblique nib will get a bit of a rest. I do like the nib and the pen so it will be back in the rotation soon enough.

Ink & Pen Notes: Sailor Pro Gear Regency Stripe with Akkerman #10 Ijzer-Galnoten

Sailor Pro Gear Regency Stripe extra fine with Akkerman IG Ink BottleThis is one of my newer pens, acquired in mid-July. As for the P.W. Akkerman #10 Ijzer-Galnoten ink, it’s new to me and this is the first pen I’ve used it in. As you may deduce from the name, if you know Akkerman is a Dutch brand, this is an iron gall based ink.

The ink has been in my fountain pen for just a little over two weeks and I am flushing it out early. While I don’t like leaving iron gall inks in the pen too long that’s only a minor reason I’m flushing it early. Separately, I love the pen and the ink is nice enough (until it came time to clean it, but I didn’t know that yet). But the sum of them together (1 + 1) was less than two. I was bored with the combination.

Because it was an iron gall ink and I wanted to use the pen at least once a day it was always the first pen I picked up each day. Because I was writing less it was often the only pen I picked up on a day. This contributed to the boredom with the ink.

The very first time I wrote with the pen it but down a weak blue line which I didn’t like at all. It did darken as it dried, but I dislike true-blues so it was a bad first impression. While the paper does matter the ink has become more blue-black, even when it first hits the paper so it’s more to my liking. It also darkens a bit as it dries. Still, this was a step down, in my opinion, from the previous fill of the R & K Blau-Schwarz LE which is also a blue-black ink.

The ink level in the converter barely seemed to be lowering which I attributed to the very thin nib. Yet when I emptied the pen I found very little ink left in the converter, most of the ink coated the sides of the converter making it appear mostly full. This was the first indication that cleaning might be a problem. Flushing the pen itself was problem free and relatively quick. But because of the problems with the converter I did give the nib unit a short bath in the UC just to be safe.

I have to disassemble the Sailor converter to clean it up. Repeated fill and flush just did not clear the ink so I had to get in there with q-tips and tissue. Even that wasn’t enough. There was one small stain that stuck around until I soaked it in some pen flush then put it in the UC. I was quit surprised this ink as such a hassle to clean after just two weeks.

I’ll be re-inking the Sailor Pro Gear Regency Stripe within a day or two. It’s new enough to still be a favorite, although I do think it will keep that favorite tag for years. I really like the pen and want to keep it inked up. As for the Akkerman Ijzer-Galnoten ink, the problematic cleanup has really turned me off for an ink that failed to stand out.