Ink & Pen Notes: Sailor Pro Gear Regency Stripe (EF) with Sailor Nano Sei-Boku (Blue-Black)

Sailor Pro Gear Regency Stripe (EF) with Sailor Blue-Black (pigment) cartridgesMy Sailor Pro Gear Regency Stripe with its extra fine nib and Sailor Nano Sei-boku blue-black ink is a holdover from last year, having been inked up in early December. That’s a long time to have a pigment ink, even a nano pigment ink, in any pen. This one is a thin Japanese extra fine nib which, on the surface, seems like a bad combination. In the 7+ months that the pen was inked the combination was completely problem free. No hard starts and no skipping, just smooth writing.

Ever since the original converter leaked a full load into the barrel of this pen I’ve stuck to cartridges. Since I prefer a dark ink with this thin nib this hasn’t been a problem since I do like the Sailor ink. It was a cartridge again this time out.

The Regency Stripe spent most of its time in my Nock Co. Fodderstack XL which travels in my shirt pocket. Any fountain pen in this roll gets limited use and the Regency Stripe got even less use. As a screw-cap pen, and one that needs about two complete rotations to uncap, it isn’t quick to use and I would often pick the Retro 51 that was next to it for any quick note. But it did get used occasionally when I sat down to write. I did like having a very thin nib always available to me. In July I moved it to my Penvelope 6 and it got frequent use during the month. The nib has a nice firmness to it with just a little spring and the ink flow is consistently good.

It was about a week before I got around to flushing out the dry pen. Again, not something I like to do with a pigment ink but in this case the pen was easy to clean out. I cleaned two other pens with it and this was the easiest and quickest by far.

I’m already missing the Sailor Pro Gear Regency Stripe from my rotation. I keep having this internal debate about sticking with pens I like or going with a variety. I think this one will return to the rotation in August, but this time it will be in my pen case where I’ll use it regularly.

Sailor Pro Gear Regency Stripe (EF) with Sailor Blue-Black (pigment) writing sample

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Ink and Pen Notes: Sailor Pro Gear King of Pen (M) with Callifolio Aurora

Sailor Pro Gear King of Pen (M) with Callifolio AuroraSure enough, as I predicted in my currently inked post, the Sailor Pro Gear KOP with Callifolio Aurora had about one and a half pages of ink left this month and it went dry on it’s first outing of the month.

The Sailor King of Pen with it’s nice medium nib is my go to pen for trying new inks. It’s also a big, comfortable pen I use for longish writing sessions at a desk or table. For me, the medium nib is also wider than my usual choice which means I tend to be more deliberate when I’m using the pen. All this means I tend to use the KOP with good paper. The worst paper I use it on is probably a Doane Writing Pad and that paper is pretty good.

The wide nib and dark ink did result in some annoying show-through on some thin Staples sugarcane paper that I use. This show-through is hardly unique with this combination and it’s more common than I would like with this paper.

The ink is made by (or for) l’Artisan Pastellier in France. The ink doesn’t claim to be waterproof although I didn’t test that trait, either by accident or on purpose. The ink has some nice shading to it, at least with this nib. I’ve seen the ink described as having a dry flow. I like inks/nibs less than wet (ok, dry) so I didn’t consider this a dry ink, it had a nice consistent flow to it. Dry time was fast enough to avoid accidental smudges. There wasn’t any bleed-through or noticeable feathering.

Distribution in the U.S. seems to be limited. I got my 40ml bottle from Vanness Pens which also has it in 50ml pouches along with ink samples. The pouch is the best value but you’ll either need to decant the ink or use an eye dropper to fill a pen. JetPens also has the 40ml bottles. The bottle is a nice wedge shape which is the same bottle as the Diamine Anniversary inks which forms a circle when placed side-to-side. This does point to Diamine being the manufacturer of the ink.

I really, really like the color of this ink and it’s well behaved. I bought it when I went on a terra cotta themed ink buying binge that coincided with the announcement of the Visconti Brunelleschi. So the next fountain pen for the Callifolio Aurora will be the Brunelleschi. I have a second Callifolio ink that is still unopened, so it will be next for the Sailor King of Pen. It’ll be a week or more since I want to write a couple more pens dry before I ink up anything new.

Sailor Pro Gear King of Pen (M) with Callifolio Aurora

Additional Reading

Callifolio Aurora Ink: A Review — The Pen Addict

Ink & Pen Notes: Sailor Pro Gear King of Pen with Bookbinders Red-Belly Black

Sailor KOP with Bookbinders Red-Belly Black ink bottleI inked up my Sailor Pro Gear King of Pen (M) with Bookbinders Red-Belly Black ink back on January 30th. I wrote it dry the evening of February 28th. Yes, I know it was in my March 1st currently inked post, but that’s what happens when I write posts on the weekend and schedule them for during the week. It was March 1st in some parts of the world.

Continuing my current practice, the Sailor KOP was my inaugural pen for this ink. The ink was a bit clingy as I filled the pen, forming a film on the nib and section that was harder than usual to wipe off. But once it was in the pen it behaved well. I expected a little nib creep or ink clinging to the converter, but neither happened. The ink was also easy to flush from the pen. The ink and pen were well behaved from fill to finish.

Bookbinders Red-Belly Black puts down a wet, thick, dark black line. Dry time was about normal and I didn’t have any accidental smudges while using the pen. Others have mentioned a red sheen in the ink, but I didn’t notice any during regular use of the pen. There was a little hint of red in places where the ink was heavier than normal, such as making two passes when writing, or with a swab.It will probably show more red color in a wetter or flex nib.

Bookbinders Red-Belly Black is a nice black ink that I wouldn’t hesitate to use again, but at the same time I’m not rushing to get it into another pen. As for the Sailor King of Pen, it continues to show why I like it so much. It’s already been filled with another new (to me) ink.

Sailor KOP (medium) with Bookbinders Red-Belly Black writing sample

Additional Reading

Reviewed on FPN

 

Ink & Pen Notes: Sailor Pro Gear King of Pen (M) with Montblanc Lucky Orange

Sailor Pro Gear KOP (M) with Montblanc Lucky Orange bottleLucky Orange is Montblanc’s latest Limited Edition ink and a recent addition to my ink accumulation. I picked the Sailor Pro Gear King of Pen with a medium nib as the inaugural fountain pen for the ink. It’s the sixth ink for this pen and it’s third straight orange.

I have to say, Montblanc Lucky Orange is my favorite orange ink so far, although it hasn’t been perfect. I admit to having a bias towards Montblanc inks since they usually perform consistently well in my pens, especially my typical thin nib, and I expected (and want) to like this ink.

Dried Montblanc Lucky Orange in the feedAs usual the Sailor KOP performed well. Lucky Orange is a straight-on, vibrant orange. There wasn’t any real shading or line variation with this nib. The flow was consistently good. This was despite the feed showing signs of the ink drying out more than usual. I didn’t have any problems with the ink drying out on the nib when I was using the pen, even with pauses of about 2 minutes. The ink was easy to clean from the pen.

The ink seems to go onto the paper nearly dry but that’s an allusion. I had a few accidental smudges while taking notes as the dry time is longer than I expected. I needed about 30 – 45 seconds to avoid smudges, depending on the paper. The drying time is my only complaint about this ink.

The ink lasted well over a month. I typically used the pen to write headings as I took notes. I did use it for regular writing on occasion, but a full page of this bright orange is a bit bright if I (or anyone else) wants to read the page.

I considered giving it a second fill of Lucky Orange but decided to try the ink in a thin nib next. I already know I like it with this one and I’m curious about how the ink will do in a fine or extra fine nib.

Montblanc Lucky Orange is a Limited Edition ink, but like most LE inks there’s not much of a clue as to how limited it is (or isn’t). Since Montblanc doesn’t have an orange in their ink lineup I decided to risk a purchase of two bottles. I don’t regret the purchase.

Both Montblanc Lucky Orange and the Sailor Pro Gear King of Pen will soon return to the rotation, just not together.

Sailor Pro Gear KOP (M) with Montblanc Lucky Orange writing sample

This Just In: Sailor Pro Gear King of Pen

Sailor Pro Gear King of Pen - capped on standThe Sailor Pro Gear King of Pen in black with rhodium trim and a medium nib was my first fountain pen purchase of the 2016 DC Pen Show. It happened before lunch on Friday when I bought it from Anderson Pens before their table became packed with people.

The King of Pen has been on my watch list for almost a year. It moved close to the top a couple of months ago and I began researching it more aggressively. I like the size of the pen and love Sailor nibs. I have a couple of it’s smaller siblings and love them.

The KOP nib is springier than the Sailor nibs that I’m used to. I was concerned it would be mushy, like the Pelikan M1000 nib I tried in the past. While all the indications were that this would not be the case, I still had some doubts. My second concern was that this nib was only available in medium and broad (the bespoke nibs aren’t for me) which are not my preferred nib sizes. It is a Japanese medium so it wouldn’t be too wide. I could get the nib ground down but I don’t like doing that until I’ve experienced the stock nib for a little while, if only to see what it’s like. So I knew I wouldn’t have it worked on at the show.

A nice thing about the pen shows, besides the ability to see and touch the pen, is the ability to talk to people who have used the pen, or have one to try. So I left the Anderson Pens table fairly sure I would be getting the KOP but did some more exploration and consideration before I returned and bought the pen.

The King of Pen is an expensive pen, but this particular model is the “entry level” and therefore least expensive version. It also helps that I really like black & rhodium fountain pens.

I picked KWZ Gummiberry (non-IG) as the pens first ink. I was anxious to ink the pen so I was limited to the four inks I had purchased at the show. While I don’t like using a new (to me) ink in a new (to me) fountain pen, I wasn’t willing to wait. This ink seemed like a safe choice in a converter fill pen, plus I thought a wider nib would show off this ink better than my typical thin nib. I was thrilled with the combination. The KOP is a terrific writer, smooth and skip-free. In short, all my concerns about the nib vanished. I love it. I have a light touch so there’s really no spreading of the tines (not that the nib is flexible) and it’s a thin Japanese medium line.

I don’t have any experience with this ink so I can’t say how it affects my impression of the pen. It’s no surprise that this nib is wetter than my typical nib choice, but it’s not too wet for me. I expect to use this pen differently than an extra fine nib. My writing is a little bigger when I use it. If my writing speeds up the letters do close up so I need to slow down a bit. None of this is a huge difference and it’s a pleasant experience when I just want to write. Naturally the draft of this article was written with the pen.

As expected, the pen feels and looks solidly built. There’s a nice tall collar around the converter to help hold it straight and in place. There’s a cutout in the collar so the ink level can be viewed. The lettering around the capband and the anchor imprint in the cap finial are nice and crisp.

Black and silver is a pretty basic look, especially when compared to other KOP models but I like it a lot. It may be the new pen glow talking, but the Sailor Pro Gear King of Pen is a rival to my Visconti Homo Sapien Bronze Age as my favorite fountain pen.

Sailor Pro Gear King of Pen - uncapped on stand

Sailor Pro Gear KOP medium nib writing sample with KWZ Gummiberry ink

This is a post about the 2016 Washington DC Pen Show. My show summary and links to other show posts are here.