Saying Goodbye: Visconti Brunelleschi

Visconti Brunelleschi Limited Edition box top viewI recently sold odd my Visconti Brunelleschi LE fountain pen. This seems like a good time for a review and let you know why I sold it.

I bought the Brunelleschi back in March 2018 when it was originally released. I was enamored with Terra Cotta at the time, purchasing several Terra Cotta inspired inks.

While it make sound strange for a pen that I’m selling, there’s nothing I don’t like about this pen.

So why sell? The pen doesn’t call out to me. It’s only been filled five times (with four inks) and I didn’t missed it when it wasn’t inked up. It didn’t fill a unique niche in my accumulation. I’ve grown to enjoy medium nibs more over time, but it isn’t my only nice medium nib, although it is one of my top medium nibs. My Montblanc LeGrand and Sailor KOP both call out to me and I miss them when they aren’t inked. My Visconti Homo Sapien is the same size and the extra fine nib is more versatile for me. Plus, the Homo Sapien is another pen I miss when it isn’t inked.

Because the Brunelleschi is such a nice pen I felt guilty not using it enough. It deserves a better home. Finally, one reason to sell sooner rather than later is that I still have all the packaging and accessories. My track record for keeping these isn’t good.

Some observations about the Visconti Brunelleschi:

  • The pen is comfortable in my hand and I can use it for extended writing sessions without fatigue.
  • Visconti has a reputation for bad quality control with their nibs. This nib was great out of the box, as was my Homo Sapien.
  • The pen has a nice, consistent flow.

I used four different inks in the pen, all performed well.

  • Visconti Brown (Sepia) that came with the pen. I never did find out the specific name for this ink and it’s a assumption.
  • Callifolio Aurora – This was a little tedious to clean from the pen. Not exactly hard, just took a long time. Desire the extra cleaning time, I used this ink twice.
  • Montblanc Encre du Desert (Brown)
  • Diamine Terracotta

The Visconti Brunelleschi had everything going for it, it just didn’t click with me. It has a lot of good competiion among my accumulation so I decided to sell it off.

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Ink & Pen Notes: Visconti Homo Sapien (EF) with P.W. Akkerman #12 Mauritshuis Magenta

Visconti Homo Sapien (EF) with Akkerman #28 Mauritshuis Magenta ink bottleMy favorite pen, the Visconti Homo Sapient Bronze Age was filled with P.W. Akkerman #12 Mauritshuis Magenta ink back on June 12th. It lasted about six weeks, which is about normal these days. (I’m late getting these notes out.)

The ink performed well in this pen, no skipping or hard starts. It’s a little slow to dry so I did have one or two accidental smudges. The ink was easy enough to clean out of the power filler (similar or identical to a vacuum filler). Cleaning this pen is always tedious, but the time needed to flush this ink was normal. The ink doesn’t even pretend to be water resistant which does help in the cleaning.

The extra fine nib didn’t provide any noticeable shading or line variation and the ink wasn’t as vibrant as it was with a medium nib. There was enough pop to make Mauritshuis Magenta and an extra fine nib the perfect combination for marking up documents.

While I don’t think any ink should be banned from the workplace, I have to admit I probably wouldn’t use this pen/ink combo for long work related documents to be read by others. (Although these days anything that meets that definition is almost certainly electronic.). While I like the color a page full of this ink from an extra fine nib is neon bright and can be a bit off-putting. While a medium nib provides enough shading and line variation to provide some character and a full page of writing would feel less like an assault on the eyes.

The Visconti Homo Sapient Bronze Age will certainly return to the rotation very soon. It’s still my all-around favorite fountain pen but I am giving it some breaks these days. I really like the color of the Akkerman Mauritshuis Magenta, and since I don’t have too many magenta inks I’m sure it will be back. The color makes it ideal for highlighting documents and making notes that stand out. Unfortunately, it’s slowish dry time hurts it in these roles.

Visconti Homo Sapien (EF) with Akkerman #28 Mauritshuis Magenta writing sample

Ink & Pen Notes: Visconti Brunelleschi (M) with Callifolio Aurora

Visconti Brunelleschi (M) with Callifolio Aurora ink bottleThe Visconti Brunelleschi is the fountain pen that triggered my terra cotta themed ink buying binge that Callifolio Aurora was swept up in. It was my first Callifolio ink and it made a good first impression. It uses the same wedge shaped 40ml bottle as the Diamine Anniversary inks, so the ink may be manufactured by Diamine, or they may just share bottles.

The Brunelleschi has a smooth medium nib and has a nice consistent ink flow. There’s no real shading or line variation with this combination but that doesn’t mean I don’t like it. I do like the color and the medium nib does a good job of showing it off. While not fast drying, it dries fast enough to prevent my accidental smudges.

Callifolio Aurora performed well enough to earn a return to this rotation, although it probably won’t be in this pen, at least not right away. I’ll pick another terra cotta themed ink when the Visconti Brunelleschi returns to the rotation, which will be soon.

Visconti Brunelleschi (M) with Callifolio Aurora writing sample